Exploring the revamped playground at Sandringham inspired by the Duchess of Cambridge


Adventures at Sandringham: Discovering the revamped playground inspired by the Duchess of Cambridge at the Queen’s Norfolk estate

  • The outdated experience playground at the Queen’s Sandringham estate in Norfolk has experienced a revamp 
  • It was inspired by a yard designed by the Duchess of Cambridge at the 2019 Chelsea Flower Show 
  • The centrepiece is a duplicate of the 1877 Appleton H2o Tower, crafted to improve water good quality at Sandringham

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‘Drive 50 miles to go to an journey playground. Why would you do that?’ 

‘Because it can be not any aged playground,’ I replied, ‘It’s been built by the Duchess of Cambridge.’ 

The previous adventure playground at the Queen’s Sandringham estate in Norfolk has experienced a revamp, together with other attractions. 

The Kate escape: The old adventure playground at the Queen’s Sandringham estate in Norfolk has had a revamp

The revamped play area was inspired by a garden designed by the Duchess of Cambridge at the 2019 Chelsea Flower Show

The revamped play space was influenced by a back garden intended by the Duchess of Cambridge at the 2019 Chelsea Flower Present

The centrepiece is a replica of the 1877 Appleton Water Tower, built to improve water quality at Sandringham

The centrepiece is a replica of the 1877 Appleton Water Tower, built to make improvements to drinking water good quality at Sandringham

It was impressed by the Again to Nature garden created by the Duchess of Cambridge at the 2019 Chelsea Flower Demonstrate that experienced a swing rope, a tepee and a treehouse to immerse kids in character. 

Set among the towering trees on the edge of park woodland, the enjoy products is modelled on neighborhood landmarks. 

The centrepiece is a 26ft tall reproduction of the 1877 Appleton Drinking water Tower, crafted to improve h2o quality at Sandringham. 

Nonetheless to appear are characteristics based on the ruined church close to West Newton and Queen Alexandra’s Nest, a summerhouse future to the estate’s lake. 

The playground and Royal Park are free to use, although you do pay for parking

The playground and Royal Park are free of charge to use, even though you do shell out for parking

The Duchess of Cambridge's 2019 Chelsea Flower Show playground featured a swing rope, a tepee and a treehouse

The Duchess of Cambridge’s 2019 Chelsea Flower Demonstrate playground highlighted a swing rope, a tepee and a treehouse

The Queen is shown around the Duchess of Cambridge's Back to Nature garden at the 2019 Chelsea Flower Show

The Queen is demonstrated about the Duchess of Cambridge’s Back again to Nature yard at the 2019 Chelsea Flower Present

The tower is proving popular, with its spiral staircase, chatting tubes and a 46ft prolonged slide. Then there are zip wires, swings, picnic tables and a toddlers’ spot. The 600-acre Royal Park also has two waymarked trails. 

The blue just one is two miles lengthy and the yellow, 3. You can also head for The Courtyard and its restaurant, café and shop — comprehensive of goodies for kids these types of as Bumpa, the Sandringham Bear, and local gin and beer for the grown ups. 

The playground and Royal Park are free of charge to use, even though you do spend for parking. 

If you have more mature small children who may possibly want to visit the residence and official gardens, there is a demand and make confident to ebook ahead online. I did drive 50 miles there and didn’t regret it a bit. 

For additional info visit sandringhamestate.co.british isles.



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Hyperloop network connecting Amsterdam and Paris could be running by 2028 says Hardt Hyperloop


A 620mph hyperloop network between Amsterdam and Paris – with journey times of just 90 minutes – could be up and running within the next eight years

  • Dutch firm Hardt Hyperloop is developing the ultra-fast transport technology
  • It involves travelling in a train-style pod through a steel tube in a partial vacuum
  • Study has revealed project could be economically viable and running by 2028

A hyperloop network that would whoosh passengers between Amsterdam and Paris in under 90 minutes may become a reality within the next eight years.

Dutch company Hardt Hyperloop is developing the ultra-fast transport technology, which involves a train-style pod that floats using magnetic levitation being pushed via electric propulsion at over 620mph through a steel tube maintained at a partial vacuum.

The firm says that a new study it carried out alongside the province of North Holland has revealed the project could be economically viable and be up and running as early as 2028.

A rendering showing what a hyperloop network between Amsterdam and Paris could look like. Hardt Hyperloop says the journey time would be 90 minutes 

The study looked at how accessibility, connectivity and decongestion around the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area would be impacted if a hyperloop were to be installed to link the city with other destinations in the Netherlands, as well as further afield in Europe.

It suggests that a hyperloop could carry 200,000 passengers per hour in each direction and in half the time it usually takes to travel between Amsterdam and Paris by train.

Passengers would travel from Amsterdam to Eindhoven in just 15 minutes, to Dusseldorf in less than 30 minutes and Brussels in less than an hour on five potential routes.

Hardt said: ‘The implementation of hyperloop would, in turn, have a huge economic impact and strengthen the economic value of the North Holland province.

A rendering showing what a hyperloop station would look like. A new study has shown that a hyperloop network linking Amsterdam to other cities is 'economically viable'

A rendering showing what a hyperloop station would look like. A new study has shown that a hyperloop network linking Amsterdam to other cities is ‘economically viable’ 

What a boarding platform at a hyperloop station could look like. Hyperloop travel involves a train-style pod that floats using magnetic levitation being pushed via electric propulsion at over 600mph through a steel tube maintained at a partial vacuum

What a boarding platform at a hyperloop station could look like. Hyperloop travel involves a train-style pod that floats using magnetic levitation being pushed via electric propulsion at over 600mph through a steel tube maintained at a partial vacuum

A rendering of what passengers could experience inside a hyperloop pod

A rendering of what passengers could experience inside a hyperloop pod 

WHAT IS HYPERLOOP?

Hyperloop is a proposed method of travel that would transport people at airline speeds – roughly 600 to 700mph – between distant locations.

It was unveiled by Elon Musk in 2013, who at the time said it could take passengers the 380 miles (610km) from LA to San Francisco in 30 minutes – half the time it takes a plane.

It involves a train-style pod that floats using magnetic levitation being pushed via electric propulsion through a steel tube maintained at a partial vacuum. 

The tube is suspended off the ground to protect against weather and earthquakes. 

‘The potential size of the working-age population would be considerably expanded if Amsterdam was connected to Groningen, The Hague and particularly regions such as the Ruhr area.

‘The hyperloop would create a compact region of cities on the five routes, all within a one hour, door-to-door travelling distance. This would equate to an additional GDP of 275 billion euro for the province, i.e. growth of +121 per cent.’

Jeroen Olthof, from the North Holland province’s local authority, said: ‘We know that people are willing to travel for a maximum of one hour to their work. With a high-speed hyperloop, you would be able to cover much greater distances in that time.

‘This sounds very promising. That is why we will engage in discussions with other authorities to progress this research.’

MailOnline reported in 2017 that Hardt had set up a full-scale testing centre to trial its hyperloop technology.

It consists of a 30 metre (98ft) tube with rails and the shuttle it has designed inside it.

The hyperloop concept was unveiled by Elon Musk in 2013, who at the time said it could take passengers the 380 miles (610km) from LA to San Francisco in 30 minutes

The hyperloop concept was unveiled by Elon Musk in 2013, who at the time said it could take passengers the 380 miles (610km) from LA to San Francisco in 30 minutes

MailOnline reported in 2017 that Hardt had set up a full-scale testing centre to trial its hyperloop technology. Pictured is the testing tube

MailOnline reported in 2017 that Hardt had set up a full-scale testing centre to trial its hyperloop technology. Pictured is the testing tube

The hyperloop concept was unveiled by Elon Musk in 2013, who at the time said it could take passengers the 380 miles (610km) from LA to San Francisco in 30 minutes – half the time it takes a plane. 

Hardt grew out of the competition team from the Technical University of Delft (TU Delft) that beat teams from MIT and the Technical University of Munich to win the all-around design and construction award for hyperloop from Musk’s SpaceX company.

Speaking at the time, Hardt co-founder Tim Houter said: ‘People were dreaming already of transporting humans and cargo (in hyperloops) from the 1860s, so the concept is not that new.

‘But when Elon Musk proposed it as a transportation system between San Francisco and Los Angeles it got a huge boost in renewed interest.’



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Great British seaside resorts for a post-coronavirus lockdown escape, from Brighton to Margate


Wave hello to some post-lockdown vacation inspiration.

Britain’s coastal towns are currently closed for business but one day in the near future we’ll be able to enjoy sunny days by the seaside again. Here’s our pick of some of the best beach towns, from bohemian Brighton to marvellous Margate.

Margate: Modern art – and old-fashioned amusements

Sun-drenched: Enjoy views over the beach from the open-terrace roof bar of the light-filled boutique Sands Hotel in Margate 

What’s to love: Get a slice of both traditional and modern seaside life in this corner of Kent, home to both the UK’s oldest rollercoaster at the revamped Dreamland amusement park and to the stark white cubes that make up Turner Contemporary. This art gallery was built on the site of a guesthouse that J. M. W. Turner frequented, and exhibits have included My Bed by Tracey Emin, who recently opened a Margate studio. There’s quirkiness, too, in the underground shell-lined passageways of the Shell Grotto, discovered in 1835.

Where to stay: Catch one of those fiery Turner sunsets from the open-terrace roof bar of the light-filled boutique Sands Hotel, overlooking the beach. B&B doubles cost from £130 a night (sandshotelmargate.co.uk).

Ventnor: Deckchairs amid a Mediterranean landscape

Ventnor is a seaside resort on the cliff-protected south coast of the Isle of Wight where beach huts have been fashioned from Victorian bathing machines

Ventnor is a seaside resort on the cliff-protected south coast of the Isle of Wight where beach huts have been fashioned from Victorian bathing machines

Hillside Hotel clings to a steep slope below St Boniface Down and has a Scandi-chic vibe with modern artwork

Hillside Hotel clings to a steep slope below St Boniface Down and has a Scandi-chic vibe with modern artwork

What’s to love: The unique micro-climate that exists on the cliff-protected south coast of the Isle of Wight benefits both the beach, where huts have been fashioned from Victorian bathing machines, and the Botanic Garden, where Mediterranean plants flourish. It’s just a short walk along the coastal path from one to the other. Head downhill from the gardens to the quieter Steephill Cove, where there are deckchairs to rent, rock pools to explore and amazing seafood to be found at The Boathouse restaurant and the Crab Shed.

Where to stay: Enjoy the sea views and a Scandi-chic vibe with modern artwork at the thatched Hillside, which clings to a steep slope below St Boniface Down. B&B doubles cost from £153 a night, but children under 12 aren’t allowed to stay (hillsideventnor.co.uk).

Largs: Viking battles – and a castle with a Brazilian twist

Victoriana comes with a side serving of Vikings in this north Ayrshire resort. Pictured is the pebble beach

Victoriana comes with a side serving of Vikings in this north Ayrshire resort. Pictured is the pebble beach 

Cape Cod-inspired Waterside Hotel is situated on the water’s edge, with 23 modern rooms and views to Arran

Cape Cod-inspired Waterside Hotel is situated on the water’s edge, with 23 modern rooms and views to Arran

What’s to love: Victoriana comes with a side serving of Vikings in this north Ayrshire resort – on the promenade stands the Pencil monument commemorating the Scottish victory against the Norwegians in 1263. You can find out more at the multi-media attraction Vikingar! Then take the ferry to the nearby isle of Cumbrae and admire the views of Bute and Arran as you cycle its perimeter. Refuel on your return with an ice cream at Art Deco Nardini’s before heading to medieval Kelburn Castle, which has been given a modern makeover by Brazilian artists.

Where to stay: It may be eight miles south of Largs, but at the Cape Cod-inspired Waterside Hotel you’re still situated on the water’s edge, with 23 modern rooms and views to Arran. B&B doubles cost from £152 a night (watersideayrshire.com).

Brighton: This place rocks for foodies 

Bohemian: Enjoy fish and chips on Brighton's pebble beach and take a stroll down its famous pier

Bohemian: Enjoy fish and chips on Brighton’s pebble beach and take a stroll down its famous pier  

There’s a buzzy atmosphere at the Artist Residence, with its cocktail bar, ping-pong and rooms featuring exposed brickwork, reclaimed furniture and plenty of contemporary artwork

There’s a buzzy atmosphere at the Artist Residence, with its cocktail bar, ping-pong and rooms featuring exposed brickwork, reclaimed furniture and plenty of contemporary artwork

What’s to love: In bohemian Brighton, everything rocks, from the Royal Pavilion with its dragon-festooned scarlet and gold music room and the cobbled alleyways of The Lanes to the British Airways i360 tower for views of the downs and cliffs. Swap your fish and chips by the pebbly beach for something fancier: try lobster croquettes at Murmur in the city centre or the five-course set menu at the Little Fish Market in Hove.

Where to stay: There’s a buzzy atmosphere at the Artist Residence, with its cocktail bar, ping-pong and rooms featuring exposed brickwork, reclaimed furniture and plenty of contemporary artwork. B&B doubles cost from £131 a night (artistresidence.co.uk).

Tenby: See the ruins of a medieval marvel 

Local colour: Fishing boats on the beach in the historic Pembrokeshire town of Tenby

Local colour: Fishing boats on the beach in the historic Pembrokeshire town of Tenby

The Broadmead Boutique B&B - historic home on the outside, but all stripped-back floors and bold wallpapers on the inside

The Broadmead Boutique B&B – historic home on the outside, but all stripped-back floors and bold wallpapers on the inside

What’s to love: On a promontory with sandy beaches on either side and a rainbow of Georgian houses running down to the harbour, Tenby is home to both the ruins of a medieval castle and the 19th Century St Catherine’s Fort. Explore the atmospheric alleys in this historic Pembrokeshire town, then take a trip across the water to Caldey Island where Cistercian monks make delicious chocolate and perfume.

Where to stay: Historic home on the outside, but all stripped-back floors and bold wallpapers on the inside, The Broadmead Boutique B&B is 20 minutes from the harbour. B&B doubles cost from £115 a night (broadmeadtenby.wales).

Whitby: Get a taste of the drama of Dracula

Whitby’s steps from the alleyways by the harbour to St Mary’s Church are featured in the Gothic horror novel, Dracula

Whitby’s steps from the alleyways by the harbour to St Mary’s Church are featured in the Gothic horror novel, Dracula

What’s to love: Fancy a bit of drama with your sandcastles? It was in the unlikely setting of this Yorkshire town that Bram Stoker dreamed up some of his Gothic horror novel, Dracula. The 199 steps from the alleyways by the harbour to St Mary’s Church featured in the book, and you can check out a signed copy in the new museum in the abbey ruins. It was in Whitby, too, that the explorer Captain James Cook got his sea legs, and you can take a trip on a replica of his famous ship Endeavour to see Whitby’s beach and piers.

Where to stay: Estbek House is a stylish seafood restaurant with five rooms by the beach at Sandsend. Some rooms have sea views. Half-board for two costs from £240 a night (estbekhouse.co.uk).

Newquay: Surf mecca’s on a crest of a wave

It’s now all about surfing rather than stag parties in Newquay, a resort on Cornwall’s wild and windswept north coast

It’s now all about surfing rather than stag parties in Newquay, a resort on Cornwall’s wild and windswept north coast

On a promontory overlooking Fistral Beach, The Headland has a spa, 95 traditional and contemporary rooms, and some lovely pared-back cottages on the clifftop

On a promontory overlooking Fistral Beach, The Headland has a spa, 95 traditional and contemporary rooms, and some lovely pared-back cottages on the clifftop

What’s to love: It’s now all about surfing rather than stag parties at this resort on Cornwall’s wild and windswept north coast. Nightclubs and trashy pubs have been replaced by bistros, bakers and an upmarket cocktail bar called Tom Thumb. Even celebrity chef Rick Stein has moved in, with a restaurant at Fistral Beach.

Where to stay: On a promontory overlooking Fistral Beach, The Headland has a spa, 95 traditional and contemporary rooms, and some lovely pared-back cottages on the clifftop. B&B doubles cost from £170 a night (headlandhotel.co.uk).

Bournemouth: Seven miles of sand

Bournemouth's seven sweeping miles of sand – with a handful of Blue Flag beaches – are hard to beat

Bournemouth’s seven sweeping miles of sand – with a handful of Blue Flag beaches – are hard to beat

Stay mere steps from the sand in one of the 24 stylish self-catering Bournemouth Beach Lodges, which sleep up to four adults and two children, with views across Poole Bay

Stay mere steps from the sand in one of the 24 stylish self-catering Bournemouth Beach Lodges, which sleep up to four adults and two children, with views across Poole Bay

What’s to love: There’s a reason why Dorset’s tourist mecca was voted the best seaside town at the 2019 British Travel Awards: its seven sweeping miles of sand – with a handful of Blue Flag beaches – are hard to beat. And the pier is not just home to the usual amusement arcades: there is even a pier-to-shore zipwire. For culture, go to the Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum, the home of two Victorian collectors, and visit St Peter’s Church, where novelist Mary Shelley, who wrote Frankenstein in 1818, is buried.

Where to stay: Stay mere steps from the sand in one of the 24 stylish self-catering Bournemouth Beach Lodges, which sleep up to four adults and two children, with views across Poole Bay. Four nights cost from £450 (bournemouthbeachlodges.co.uk).

Torquay: The queen of crime’s hideaway

Agatha Christie was born in Torquay and live there. Take a trip by steam train and riverboat to her holiday house of Greenway

Agatha Christie was born in Torquay and live there. Take a trip by steam train and riverboat to her holiday house of Greenway

What’s to love: Devon’s self-styled English Riviera is the perfect setting for fans of Agatha Christie, who was born and lived here. Sites on the Christie trail include prehistoric caves Kents Cavern, inspiration for The Man In The Brown Suit, and Torre Abbey, which hosts a photographic exhibition on the author until November. Take a trip by steam train and riverboat to her holiday house of Greenway, with its stunning garden, then hit the beach at Oddicombe using the Babbacombe Cliff Railway.

Where to stay: Just a few minutes from the beach, Meadfoot Bay is a Victorian villa with 15 contemporary rooms named after local coves. The grown-up feel is reflected in the clientele – children must be over 14. B&B doubles cost from £126 a night (meadfoot.com).

St Ives: Get your fill of Poldark… and pasties

Cornish charm: Pictured is Porthminster Beach in the pretty town of St Ives

Cornish charm: Pictured is Porthminster Beach in the pretty town of St Ives

The Harbour Hotel has 52 modern rooms, many with sea views, plus a spa. It can arrange picnics for the beach and guided art visits

The Harbour Hotel has 52 modern rooms, many with sea views, plus a spa. It can arrange picnics for the beach and guided art visits

What’s to love: Cornwall’s coastal landscape and beautiful beaches form the perfect backdrop to world-class art in Tate St Ives and the Barbara Hepworth museum. There’s hiking along the South West Coast Path, plus cycling inland to the old tin mines made famous by the BBC drama Poldark. For a traditional pasty, pop to S. H. Ferrell & Son.

Where to stay: Close to Porthminster beach, the Harbour Hotel has 52 modern rooms, many with sea views, plus a spa. It can arrange picnics for the beach and guided art visits. B&B doubles cost from £180 a night (harbourhotels.co.uk).

Cromer: Anyone for popcorn cockles?

Foodies flock to Cromer in Norfolk for the crabs. Tuck into a crab burger at restaurant Upstairs At No1

Foodies flock to Cromer in Norfolk for the crabs. Tuck into a crab burger at restaurant Upstairs At No1

What’s to love: Foodies flock to this pretty Norfolk town, with its brightly painted fishermen’s houses, for the crabs. Try your hand at catching one before tucking into a crab burger Upstairs At No 1 (the popcorn cockles are also pretty good). There are short strolls down the pier to the RNLI museum, longer cliff walks to Cromer Lighthouse, or inland trails past Cromer Hall, inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Hound Of The Baskervilles.

Where to stay: A private path leads to the beach from the creeper-clad The Grove, which has an indoor pool, self-catering cottages and yurts. B&B doubles cost from £115 a night (thegrovecromer.co.uk).

Llandudno: Celeb fans and a hikers’ heaven

Llandudno's trump card is a cable-operated street tramway leading up to Great Orme, a 650ft limestone headland that rises straight out of the sea

Llandudno’s trump card is a cable-operated street tramway leading up to Great Orme, a 650ft limestone headland that rises straight out of the sea

Escape B&B is pleasingly modern, with nine rooms featuring bold wallpaper and fabric headboards

Escape B&B is pleasingly modern, with nine rooms featuring bold wallpaper and fabric headboards

What’s to love: Renowned travel writer Bill Bryson’s favourite seaside resort comes with the usual promenade, pier and long sandy beaches. Its trump card, though, is a cable-operated street tramway leading up to Great Orme, a 650ft limestone headland that rises straight out of the sea. On the hiking trails, you’ll find views of the Snowdonia mountain range and sometimes to the Isle of Man. Not far away lies the medieval Conwy Castle, built by King Edward I.

Where to stay: It may be in a Victorian villa, but boutique Escape B&B is pleasingly modern, with nine rooms featuring bold wallpaper and fabric headboards. B&B doubles cost from £120 a night (escapebandb.co.uk).

North Berwick: Home to treasure island

North Berwick boasts two sandy beaches and is home to one of the world’s largest gannet colonies

North Berwick boasts two sandy beaches and is home to one of the world’s largest gannet colonies

With 11 chic rooms and a modern bistro serving local food, No 12 Hotel & Bistro has B&B doubles from £180 a night

With 11 chic rooms and a modern bistro serving local food, No 12 Hotel & Bistro has B&B doubles from £180 a night

What’s to love: Great for golfers, North Berwick near Edinburgh is also a delight for bird-watchers. Among the volcanic islands in the Firth of Forth, the impressive Bass Rock is home to one of the world’s largest gannet colonies, while the Isle of May is puffin central. You can take trips to both with guides from the Scottish Seabird Centre. A third island, Fidra, is visible from one of the two sandy beaches – it is claimed it was the inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island. Be sure to take in the clifftop Tantallon Castle, too.

Where to stay: With 11 chic rooms and a modern bistro serving local food, No 12 Hotel & Bistro has B&B doubles from £180 a night (no12hotelandbistro.co.uk).

Newcastle: The sleepy gateway to Narnia

Newcastle is a sleepy seaside town in County Down in Northern Ireland. Pictured - the Mourne Mountains

Newcastle is a sleepy seaside town in County Down in Northern Ireland. Pictured – the Mourne Mountains 

An impressive Victorian hotel, Slieve Donard may have a slight corporate feel to its 120 rooms these days, but it also has a lovely spa overlooking the beach

An impressive Victorian hotel, Slieve Donard may have a slight corporate feel to its 120 rooms these days, but it also has a lovely spa overlooking the beach

What’s to love: This sleepy seaside town in County Down in Northern Ireland is the gateway to some amazing hiking trails, plus other activities from biking to bouldering. Tollymore Forest Park is overshadowed by the mysterious Mourne Mountains, which gave C . S. Lewis inspiration for Narnia, and which meet the sea in a series of tumbling sand dunes at Murlough National Nature Reserve.

Where to stay: An impressive Victorian hotel, Slieve Donard may have a slight corporate feel to its 120 rooms these days, but it also has a lovely spa overlooking the beach. B&B doubles cost from £163 a night (hastingshotels.com).

Blackpool: The leading light of holiday towns

Traditional fun: Young children can take donkey rides along Blackpool’s sandy beach

Traditional fun: Young children can take donkey rides along Blackpool’s sandy beach

The new Boulevard Hotel has 120 contemporary rooms, including well-designed family rooms with bunk beds

The new Boulevard Hotel has 120 contemporary rooms, including well-designed family rooms with bunk beds

What’s to love: Check out why 18 million visitors a year make a trip to the original kiss-me-quick resort in Lancashire. As well as Blackpool Tower, thrills and spills at Pleasure Beach, the UK’s largest indoor waterpark and even a Madame Tussauds, there are more shows than you can list on an I Love Blackpool postcard. Buy a stick of rock and embrace it all. If you visit from September until early November, you can also catch the world-famous Illuminations.

Where to stay: The new Boulevard Hotel has 120 contemporary rooms, including well-designed family rooms with bunk beds. Room-only doubles cost from £89 a night (boulevardhotel.co.uk).

  • Prices are for both August and September.



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Jersey’s my oyster! Discovering the island’s largest oyster farm and learning how to ‘shuck’ them 


The most sought-immediately after food items are inclined to divide opinion — and for very good purpose. The truffle, pulled from the filth, normally by a pig, can be frustrating, caviar leaves quite a few cold, and it is most effective not to imagine about how foie gras is manufactured.

The oyster is summed up by creator Jonathan Swift: ‘He was a bold person that 1st ate an oyster.’

But I’m not so sure about that. Standing at the water’s edge at Jersey’s Royal Bay of Grouville, in the torrential rain, I’m searching forward to attempting a person and understanding about its unique style and texture.

Mont Orgueil Castle in Jersey, wherever 3D images of the Queen adorn the walls

I’m traveling to the island’s premier oyster farm, Seymour Oyster, operate by John and Shannon Le Seelleur. It has beds extending around 13 hectares and includes about 14 million oysters.

John, a 17th-technology farmer and island indigenous, states working the sea is just like working the land. Hunting at the uniform rows of oyster beds running alongside the beach front, it’s tricky to disagree.

John’s rock oysters go to the Dorchester, Borough Industry, France and beyond.

They are salty, fresh new and, while probably not an aphrodisiac, they are unquestionably energising.

John clarifies the two-to-3-12 months course of action from seed to harvest, as Shannon teaches me how to ‘shuck’ an oyster — wiggle, really don’t push. John likes to eat his simple, or grilled on the barbecue so they steam inside of their shells, then brushed with garlic butter. Shannon provides balsamic vinegar, purple shallots and chillies to hers.

Jersey is also dwelling to the rarer, rounder, sweeter indigenous oysters. Regrettably, 95 for every cent of all Uk natives disappeared owing to above-fishing in the 19th century, but re-cultivation endeavours are now less than way. Immediately after our tour, we stop by magnificent Mont Orgueil Castle, where 3D pictures of the Queen adorn the walls.

St Brelade's Bay, which shares a seafront with the Winston Churchill Memorial Park

St Brelade’s Bay, which shares a seafront with the Winston Churchill Memorial Park

They ended up produced from portraits by area photographer Chris Levine in 2004 to celebrate 800 yrs since Jersey split from the Duchy of Normandy.

Remaining British but eliminated from the mainland puts Jersey and its 106,000 inhabitants in an appealing placement.

It is not portion of the British isles, but it is a British isle, ruled by its have parliament — the States Assembly.

All through Globe War II, it was the only part of the British Isles to be occupied.

The island waited very long following D-Working day, right until Might 1945, for liberation, but no one particular appears to be to keep a grudge.

Delicacy: Oysters are a part of Jersey's culinary scene. Seymour Oyster farm has over 13 hectares of beds with around 14 million oysters

Delicacy: Oysters are a component of Jersey’s culinary scene. Seymour Oyster farm has over 13 hectares of beds with close to 14 million oysters

Without a doubt, St Brelade’s Bay Hotel, where by we are keeping, shares a seafront with the Winston Churchill Memorial Park. It also overlooks one of south Jersey’s sweeping crescent moon seashores. It’s a true charmer.

When, 1 morning, I saunter as a result of reception in my swimming trunks, heading to the beach for a dip, and passing a sea of anoraks, umbrellas and water-proof trousers, no a person bats an eyelid.

Normally, in the evenings, we sample the Seymour oysters in two exceptional eating places, Sumas and The Oyster Box, both of which have views in excess of the 14-mile extend of sea that separates Jersey and Normandy.

On our ultimate working day, good rain attracts in, but it doesn’t difficulty us. The temperature in Jersey could be changeable, but the oysters are normally trustworthy.

Vacation Points

Hugo travelled with Pay a visit to Jersey (jersey.com). BA (ba.com) flies Gatwick to Jersey from £76 return. B&B Doubles at the St Brelade’s Bay Resort from £220 for every evening (stbreladesbayhotel.com). Hertz (hertzci.com) rental autos from £72.29 for the weekend. 

 

 



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A review of The Kings Arms Hotel, Hampton Court


Excellent British Boltholes: Shed oneself in remarkable luxurious at The Kings Arms Lodge in London’s Hampton Court docket

  • Kings Arms Hotel is sandwiched between Bushy Park and Hampton Court Palace 
  • It champions the very best of British during – from delicate furnishings to develop
  • James Mannion visited and explained the hotel is ‘a jewel in the crown of the area’

When he wasn’t on the hunt for yet another queen (or disposing of the former incumbent), King Henry VIII usually devoted his time to amassing residence – with substantial accomplishment. By the conclusion of his reign he owned much more than 60 residences and palaces – unrivalled by any British monarch in advance of or given that – and amongst their amount was Hampton Court docket Palace. It’s a single of two of his palaces even now standing (St James’s becoming the other) and it draws admirers by the coachload.

Set in beautiful grounds, Hampton Courtroom is a sight to behold – even on a gray, soaked working day at the tail stop of wintertime. It helped immensely that our base for discovering was The Kings Arms – a Quality II listed 18th Century former inn, now a wonderful boutique resort and cafe.

It is a serene saunter from the hotel to the palace alone, and in actuality The Kings Arms is so close that it basically backs on to the palace’s well-known maze, the UK’s oldest surviving illustration. The resort was not long ago extensively refurbished above two years, formally reopening last summer time.

Fit for a king: The lodge with the well known Hampton Court maze at the rear of it

Championing the finest of British all through – be it comfortable furnishings or foods substances – the resort is a jewel in the crown of the area. 

Downstairs is the cafe and bar, although upstairs are the 14 visitor bedrooms. The natural way, supplied the historic character of the building, the en suite rooms differ in sizing and shape, even though each individual has tea- and espresso-building facilities and a absolutely stocked (payable) mini-bar. It beats me, however, why any individual would select to drink in their area when downstairs is the aforementioned comfy bar – and out front is a spacious, non-public terrace providing enough seating for a cocktail or two in the sunshine when the climate permits.

The place restaurant – named The Six, following the number of Henry’s wives – is property to the Michelin-starred Mark Kempson. 

His dishes boast refreshing vegetables, fruit and herbs type the Hampton Court docket Palace kitchen backyard garden, so you can rightfully claim to be consuming meals fit for royalty. We tucked into oxtail and gruyere croquettes and crispy whitebait for starters, mains were gossamer-gentle battered fish and chips and a significant aged sirloin, also with chips. Dessert was at first passed above for panic of gluttony, but the supply of treacle tart and a chocolate pavé proved too a great deal to transform down.

There are 14 guestrooms upstairs with 'super-comfy' beds and limited-edition prints

There are 14 guestrooms upstairs with ‘super-comfy’ beds and confined-edition prints 

The USP: Hampton Courtroom Palace. The resort is sandwiched among Bushy Park and the palace itself. Slightly further afield – but still walkable – are strolls down the banking institutions of the River Thames and, if you extravagant a flutter, Kempton Park racecourse.

The rooms: These are either remarkable, luxurious or deluxe and every single is adorned with unique or confined-version prints overlooking super-comfortable beds.

The food: The 6 is definitely its secret weapon and all our foods was exceptional: £35pp for 3 courses. Continental breakfast is integrated, showcasing such delights as Chapel Farm duck eggs on toasted sourdough, cooked any design.



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Skiing is great, but for real thrills, head to Saalbach in Austria and try some mountain madness 


What do you do soon after a lavish meal of deer tartar, steaming pork knuckle and dumplings, topped off with apple strudel, washed down with Austrian red wine and a parting shot of mountain firewater?

Why, you wobble out into the darkness of the Austrian Alps, don a crash helmet, say ‘Danke’ to a grizzled guy with a piercing stare who palms you a toboggan, and move forward to hurtle down a snowy slope, all the when whooping with delight.

Saalbach may be just one of the very best ski resorts in Austria, with far more than 170 miles of slopes organized in a ‘Skicircus’ of related pistes that you can get pleasure from in a big circular route. But it is also a person of the best resorts for what you might get in touch with further-curricular mountain insanity.

Saalbach, pictured, has a lot more than 170 miles of slopes arranged in a ‘Skicircus’ of related pistes that you can love in a enormous round route

Supper at Spielberghaus is a circumstance in stage. You are dragged up the mountain in a cage-like sled at the back of a snowcat (piste-bashing equipment), devour a feast and then fly down a hill on a little plastic contraption.

This is supper the Saalbach way, and there are a great deal of other suggests by which to fill the gap in between hanging up your skis and hitting the sack.

Terrifying zipline rides across valleys, snowtubing (zooming down slopes on inflated tyres), tandem paragliding to ‘feel as totally free as a fowl as you fly by means of the air at the identical peak as the clouds’, tiptoeing alongside towering treetop walks, and snowmobile racing on bumpy mountainside tracks are just a number of of the pursuits on offer away from the most important slopes.

The zipline journey, termed Traveling Fox XXL, is not for the faint-hearted. Standing by the edge of a 470ft precipice, you are provided a crash helmet, linked to a wire, wished ‘Guten Flug’ (Good flight) and released throughout the abyss.

Down below, a pine forest spreads out as you get to speeds of 80mph before descending for just one mile. The working experience lasts only about 90 seconds, but your recollections of it will very last a whole lot for a longer time.

Afterwards, if however in the mood for high adventure, head for the Golden Gate & Treetop Trail at a single close of the Saalbach-Hinterglemm valley.

Soar like a bird: Intrepid users of the Flying Fox XXL zipline can reach speeds of up to 80mph

Soar like a bird: Intrepid end users of the Flying Fox XXL zipline can achieve speeds of up to 80mph 

Listed here you will come across a 650ft-prolonged suspension bridge spanning a canyon-like void, with the Saalbach River 140ft underneath.

This is substantially gentler than the Traveling Fox XXL but it is even now a incredibly long way up and fairly slim, major to a outstanding network of wooden walkways through the cover of a larchwood forest. It is the highest these types of treetop path in Europe.

For those people who have had their fill of heights, choose the horse-drawn sleigh down to the Golden Gate & Treetop Trail’s car park and set off for Snowmobile Town.

As soon as crash helmets have been distributed – seemingly the prelude to most off-piste routines – you are seated on snowmobiles and offered a thumbs-up before you zoom off for a observe lap of the bumpy observe.

Overtaking may be executed, adhering to cautiously the instructor’s rules. The greatest portion, nevertheless, is just allowing the throttle go on uphill sections and experience that unfamiliar feeling of surging up the mountain.

We have lift-off: A visitor hurtles down the slopes on a giant tube

We have carry-off: A customer hurtles down the slopes on a big tube 

In action-packed Saalbach, which attracts a hardy group, apres-ski appears to have excess gusto and the epicentre is Hinterhag Alm, a wooden barn-like creating where karaoke is heading strong by 4pm.

The bash goes on into the early hrs, the later on-evening hub staying the club in the basement of the Saalbacher Hof hotel in the city centre. Hope reside audio and persons commonly letting loose.

But that is not to say that family members are unsuited to the sights of Saalbach. Mothers and fathers with adolescents and middle-aged couples appear to have fallen for the demanding, permit-it- all-go environment. But no just one would seem to overdo it either.

Which is the way it goes in Saalbach: ski tough, do all the things tough – then get up the subsequent working day, action out into the crisp Alpine air, and do it all once again.

Journey FACTS 

T. D. Isacke was a guest of Saalbach and Salzburgerland Tourist Boards (saalbach.com, salzburgerland.com) and Crystal Ski Vacations (crystalski.co.uk), which offers seven nights’ fifty percent-board at the Saalbacher Hof lodge from £1,379pp, which includes flights and transfers. A 6-day raise pass prices from £222. 

 



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The hotels where… the spa’s the star from Sopwell House to the Old Course Hotel


There was a time when a spa in a British hotel meant a couple of treatment rooms in the basement.

These days, wellness offerings are often the main draw, offering everything from sunlight therapy to altitude training – and even an underwater treadmill…

SOPWELL HOUSE, ST ALBANS

Classical design: One of the treatment rooms at Sopwell House’s new spa, called Cottonmill. Massages are enjoyed on the quartz and amber bed 

Wow factor: The massages you’ll enjoy on the quartz and amber bed at Sopwell House’s new spa, called Cottonmill, are among the best (60 minutes, £99). The grains are heated to 42 degrees (ancient Egyptians apparently used sand to cure muscle pain) while the vibrating bed is tilted to aid circulation. 

The Club at Cottonmill is the kind of place at which you could easily spend a day, moving between the outdoor hydrotherapy pool and the deep relaxation room with colour-changing seats. 

Among the 128 hotel rooms are 16 modern mews suites, some with private hot tubs.

Cost: A one-night half-board stay with a 60-minute treatment plus lunch costs from £289pp (sopwellhouse.co.uk). 

GRANTLEY HALL, RIPON

Wow factor: For seriously cutting-edge facilities alongside an excellent spa, look no further than Grantley Hall, which opened last year.

Chill out in the snow room and cryotherapy chamber (to increase cell rejuvenation and reduce signs of ageing), work out on the underwater treadmill or in the altitude training studio, and book sessions on everything from life coaching to gait analysis. 

There is all the normal spa stuff here too, and an 18-metre pool. The 47 rooms are divided between the classical country house style in the Palladian mansion and coolly contemporary ones in the new spa wing.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £275; a 60-minute massage is £90 (grantleyhall.co.uk).

RUDDING PARK, HARROGATE

Champagne reception: Enjoy a glass of bubbly during a break at Rudding Park, pictured. It has a hydrotherapy pool, hot tub and herbal steam room

Champagne reception: Enjoy a glass of bubbly during a break at Rudding Park, pictured. It has a hydrotherapy pool, hot tub and herbal steam room

Wow factor: Grantley Park isn’t the only innovative spa in Yorkshire: less than 15 miles away, Rudding Park is home to a two-storey facility topped by an open air spa garden with a hydrotherapy pool, hot tub and herbal steam room. 

There’s a sunlight therapy room to drive away winter blues, an oxygen pod to help prevent signs of ageing and to strengthen the immune system, and even CBD-infused spa extras, with baths, foot rubs and tongue sprays incorporating (legal) cannabidiol. 

The 90 contemporary rooms include spa rooms with a private steam room, sauna or spa bath.

Cost: A one-night half-board stay with a 50-minute treatment costs from £185.50pp (ruddingpark.co.uk).

Soothing: Enjoy a facial at Dormy House, a converted farmhouse on the Farncombe estate

Soothing: Enjoy a facial at Dormy House, a converted farmhouse on the Farncombe estate 

DORMY HOUSE, BROADWAY, WORCESTERSHIRE

Wow factor: Spas don’t come much sexier than at Dormy House, with its candlelit infinity pool, outdoor hot tub by the fire and Scandi-style thermal suite. 

There’s even a Veuve Clicquot Champagne nail room. 

Grown-up treatments at the Temple Spa include a champagne and truffle facial. 

The cosy converted farmhouse, on the 400-acre Farncombe estate, has 38 elegantly understated rooms.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £269; a 60-minute massage is £85 (dormyhouse.co.uk). 

OLD COURSE HOTEL, ST ANDREWS

The Old Course Hotel in St Andrews, pictured, is home to the Kohler Waters Spa, a hydrotherapy haven with treatments using seaweed and marine extracts

The Old Course Hotel in St Andrews, pictured, is home to the Kohler Waters Spa, a hydrotherapy haven with treatments using seaweed and marine extracts

Wow factor: Yes, this hotel overlooking one of the world’s most famous golf courses is a haven for golfers, but those in the know also go for its Kohler Waters Spa, a hydrotherapy haven with treatments using seaweed and marine extracts. 

Other features include a 20-metre swimming pool, hydrotherapy pool and rooftop hot tub. 

Try the 90-minute Sok Overflowing Bath With Massage (£148) where you wallow in a chromotherapy bath before some serious pummelling. The 144 rooms have tartan touches, and there’s also a whisky tasting room.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £275; a 50-minute scrub is £94 (oldcoursehotel.co.uk).

SEAHAM HALL, COUNTY DURHAM

Inside the spa at Seaham Hall in County Durham. It has just launched a series of therapies combining Ishga, an organic seaweed skincare range, with an ancient 'touch' technique for those affected by cancer, anxiety, depression or stress

Inside the spa at Seaham Hall in County Durham. It has just launched a series of therapies combining Ishga, an organic seaweed skincare range, with an ancient ‘touch’ technique for those affected by cancer, anxiety, depression or stress

Wow factor: They’re rolling out hypnotherapy retreats as part of a move to more holistic treatments at this luxurious destination spa. 

It uses organic seaweed skincare range Ishga and has also just launched a series of therapies combining the product with an ancient ‘touch’ technique for those affected by cancer, anxiety, depression or stress. 

Whatever your need, the spa, with its 20-metre pool and floor-to-ceiling windows plus thermal rooms, is superb. Just a ten-minute walk from Seaham Beach, the 21-room elegant Georgian hotel has several hot tub suites as well as a Zen Garden with pool.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £195; a 60-minute massage is £85 (seaham-hall.co.uk).

SWAN AT LAVENHAM, SUFFOLK

A suite at the 15th Century Swan at Lavenham in Suffolk. Here guests can enjoy a mind therapy massage

A suite at the 15th Century Swan at Lavenham in Suffolk. Here guests can enjoy a mind therapy massage 

Wow factor: Feeling seriously stressed? Then hotfoot it to the Weavers’ House Spa at the 15th Century Swan at Lavenham for a Mind Therapy Massage. 

The resident hypnotherapist and meditation teacher has introduced this treatment during which clients are guided on a meditation while they enjoy a massage from a separate therapist. 

The 60-minute session (£150) can be tailored to your needs, helping stress, depression or sleeping disorders. The hotel – think timber beams and crooked corridors – has 45 rooms.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £150; a 60-minute massage is £77 (theswanatlavenham.co.uk)

Inside the Gainsborough Bath Spa, where one of the best treatments is simply to wallow in the waters in a pool flanked by Romanesque columns

Inside the Gainsborough Bath Spa, where one of the best treatments is simply to wallow in the waters in a pool flanked by Romanesque columns

GAINSBOROUGH BATH SPA

Wow factor: You may get more advanced facilities in other spa hotels, but you won’t get Bath’s natural thermal waters there, full of natural minerals to ease stiff joints, soften the skin and help rebalance the immune and nervous systems. 

At the Gainsborough Bath Spa, one of the best treatments is simply to wallow in the waters in a pool flanked by Romanesque columns. 

There are also aquatic therapies such as The Freedom Treatment, during which your body is dynamically stretched underwater by an experienced healer (45 minutes, £120).

The Grade II listed hotel has 99 rooms kitted out in a neutral (if sometimes bland) palette.

Cost: Room-only doubles cost from £290; a 60-minute massage is £120 (thegainsboroughbathspa.co.uk).

ST BRIDES SPA HOTEL, PEMBROKESHIRE 

Wow factor: It’s all about the sea at St Brides – there are spectacular views over Carmarthen Bay from the restaurant, bar, and some of the 34 nautically themed bedrooms. 

The best view of all is from the saltwater outdoor infinity pool in the boutique spa. So it’s no surprise to find that treatments are based on thalassotherapy (using seawater or products). There’s a salt infusion room among the thermal cabins, and many therapies use Irish product line Voya with organic seaweed products designed to detoxify, remineralise and restore. 

This isn’t a destination spa where you can hang out for days, but with the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park outside, that’s all for the better.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £95; a 55-minute massage is £70 (stbridesspahotel.com).

LODORE FALLS, LAKE DISTRICT

Steaming hot: The outdoor pool area at Lodore Falls in the Lake District. It has 14 Scandi-style spa suites directly above the treatment rooms

Steaming hot: The outdoor pool area at Lodore Falls in the Lake District. It has 14 Scandi-style spa suites directly above the treatment rooms

Wow factor: Lie back on an underwater lounger in the 16-metre hydrotherapy pool at Lodore Falls and enjoy glorious views over Derwentwater and the Lake District fells. 

You’ll get the same view from some 14 Scandi-style spa suites directly above the treatment rooms (there are also four spa suites in the main hotel). The rest of the beautifully designed stone and timber spa annexe includes a sprawling thermal suite and champagne bar. 

For something different, try the Akwaterra massage, where the therapist uses warm sandstone pods to relieve muscle tension (50 minutes, £85).

Cost: B&B spa suites cost from £460; a 50-minute massage is £75 (lakedistricthotels.net).

CHEWTON GLEN, HAMPSHIRE

The spa at family favourite Chewton Glen, pictured, which features Grecian-style columns

The spa at family favourite Chewton Glen, pictured, which features Grecian-style columns

Wow factor: Family favourite Chewton Glen even caters for children in the spa, with facials, manicures and scalp massages. There are 50 different treatments and therapies on offer, many using products designed specifically for the spa from nutritional skincare brand Oskia. 

If you stay in one of the hotel’s swish modern treehouses rather than the main house, you can even enjoy a massage by the hot tub on the deck. 

The spa itself has an impressive 17-metre indoor pool surrounded by Grecian columns, and one of the largest hydrotherapy pools in the UK.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £370; a 60-minute massage is £105 (chewtonglen.com).

THE SCARLET, CORNWALL

The adults-only Scarlet in Cornwall, pictured, has clifftop hot tubs as well as an outdoor barrel sauna

The adults-only Scarlet in Cornwall, pictured, has clifftop hot tubs as well as an outdoor barrel sauna

Wow factor: There are other spas in Cornwall, but the adults-only Scarlet, near Newquay, still leads the pack with its clifftop hot tubs and outdoor barrel sauna, which both offer cracking sea views.

They make the most of the seaside setting here, with seaweed scrubs in the copper tub, and amazing sea views from the indoor pool thanks to its floor-to-ceiling windows. 

Some of the 37 bedrooms – with lots of pale wood and sumptuous furnishings – enjoy the same vista.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £240; a 60-minute massage is £60 (scarlethotel.co.uk).

CAREYS MANOR & SENSPA, HAMPSHIRE

Wow factor: Check into Careys Manor, a comfortable, gleaming 18th Century manor house in Brockenhurst in the New Forest and you’ll also have access to an award-winning Thai spa.

Holistic wellness is at its core, inspired by ancient Eastern rituals offered in an exhaustive list of treatments. Even the food served in the spa restaurant, The Zen Garden, is Thai – main courses include chicken with cashew nuts and vegetables, and crispy duck with tamarind sauce.

Day packages such as ThaiTox (£159pp) is a detox with a Thai twist – and you get to take home some goodies. Visitors can take advantage of all that’s on offer from a crystal steam room, herbal sauna, ice room and hydrotherapy pools. As you would expect, the traditional Thai massage is knockout, and relaxation classes in The Thai Temple studio aim to relax and uplift.

Cost: B&B doubles cost from £175; a 60-minute traditional Thai Massage is £85 (careysmanor.co.uk).      



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Stunning images of Britain’s rivers and canals, from Wiltshire to the Highlands


They are the veins that run through our cities and countryside – Britain’s rivers, canals and tributaries have kept the nation connected through the centuries.

But aside from aiding transport, our waterways define both our urban and rural landscapes with their striking beauty.

Many an artist and writer has found inspiration while walking along a canal footpath or relaxing in a deckchair by a gently flowing river.

The Scottish novelist Kenneth Grahame famously based the setting for one of the nation’s favourite children’s novels, The Wind in the Willows, on the Thames riverside location of his childhood home in Berkshire.

And why not take your lead from Mole, Rat, Toad and Badger and go on your own adventure – be it cruising, rowing or canoeing through a glorious part of Britain, stopping for a lazy pub lunch with a view, of course.

The only question is where to start. Scroll down for our celebration of Britain’s most beautiful waterways captured throughout the seasons and see if they spark some wanderlust.

The Craigellachie Bridge is a Category A listed structure designed by Thomas Telford that crosses the River Spey. The river runs for 107 miles through northeast Scotland and is important for salmon fishing and whisky production 

The Turf Fen Windmill stands on the Norfolk Broads. The Broads is a network of 125 miles of rivers and lakes in the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The best way to explore the area is by boat

The Turf Fen Windmill stands on the Norfolk Broads. The Broads is a network of 125 miles of rivers and lakes in the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The best way to explore the area is by boat 

The River Wye runs through Wye Valley, an area of outstanding natural beauty. Pictured here is Horseshoe Bend in Letton, Herefordshire

The River Wye runs through Wye Valley, an area of outstanding natural beauty. Pictured here is Horseshoe Bend in Letton, Herefordshire 

The Avon Gorge on the River Avon is crossed by The Clifton Suspension Bridge linking Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset

The Avon Gorge on the River Avon is crossed by The Clifton Suspension Bridge linking Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset 

This stunning shot of River Brathay at dawn was taken in Elterwater in the Lake District. For its entire six-kilometre (3.7-mile) length the river forms part of the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire and Westmorland

This stunning shot of River Brathay at dawn was taken in Elterwater in the Lake District. For its entire six-kilometre (3.7-mile) length the river forms part of the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire and Westmorland

Thames Path, Dorchester, Abingdon

The Thames Path is a National Trail following the River Thames from its source near Kemble in Gloucestershire to the Thames Barrier at Charlton, south east London. It is about 184 miles long

Fog rises over the River Thurne and Thurne Mill in the Norfolk Broads. The river is just seven miles long and much of it is navigable

Fog rises over the River Thurne and Thurne Mill in the Norfolk Broads. The river is just seven miles long and much of it is navigable 

The River Thames runs through London from Tower Bridge to Canary Wharf and the Docklands. The Thames is more than 200 miles long - it's England's second-longest river - and also flows through places such as Windsor and Oxford

The River Thames runs through London from Tower Bridge to Canary Wharf and the Docklands. The Thames is more than 200 miles long – it’s England’s second-longest river – and also flows through places such as Windsor and Oxford 

Narrowboats and walkers cross the aqueduct on the Llangollen Canal in the Welsh town of Chirk. The canal, which flows through both England and Wales, was built in 1801. It is 41 miles long and takes at least three days to cruise one way

Narrowboats and walkers cross the aqueduct on the Llangollen Canal in the Welsh town of Chirk. The canal, which flows through both England and Wales, was built in 1801. It is 41 miles long and takes at least three days to cruise one way 

A golden sunrise over the woodlands and green meadows of the picturesque Wye Valley with the River Wye in full meandering mode

A golden sunrise over the woodlands and green meadows of the picturesque Wye Valley with the River Wye in full meandering mode 

A herd of cows cool off in River Windrush at Swinbrook, Oxfordshire. The Windrush starts in the Cotswold Hills in Gloucestershire and flows for about 35 miles through Bourton-on-the-Water, by the village of Windrush in Gloucestershire, into Oxfordshire and through Burford, Witney, Ducklington and Standlake. It meets the Thames at Newbridge upstream of Northmoor Lock

A herd of cows cool off in River Windrush at Swinbrook, Oxfordshire. The Windrush starts in the Cotswold Hills in Gloucestershire and flows for about 35 miles through Bourton-on-the-Water, by the village of Windrush in Gloucestershire, into Oxfordshire and through Burford, Witney, Ducklington and Standlake. It meets the Thames at Newbridge upstream of Northmoor Lock

The ruins of Brograve Windmill stand on the Norfolk Broads in Sea Palling. The mill, which is a water pump, was last used in 1930 and cannot be reached by foot. It is now a Grade II-listed building but is in a dilapidated state

The ruins of Brograve Windmill stand on the Norfolk Broads in Sea Palling. The mill, which is a water pump, was last used in 1930 and cannot be reached by foot. It is now a Grade II-listed building but is in a dilapidated state

The 12th-century Warkworth Castle is beautifully reflected in the River Coquet, which runs through Northumberland and into the North Sea on the east coast at Amble, following a winding course through villages and hamlets

The 12th-century Warkworth Castle is beautifully reflected in the River Coquet, which runs through Northumberland and into the North Sea on the east coast at Amble, following a winding course through villages and hamlets

Essex bridge, a Grade I listed packhorse bridge, crosses the River Trent at Great Haywood in Staffordshire. The 185-mile-long river is the third longest in the UK and is often described as the boundary between the Midlands and the north of England

Essex bridge, a Grade I listed packhorse bridge, crosses the River Trent at Great Haywood in Staffordshire. The 185-mile-long river is the third longest in the UK and is often described as the boundary between the Midlands and the north of England

The autumn colours of Cairngorms National Park, in northeast Scotland, are reflected in the River Spey, the second longest Scottish river

The autumn colours of Cairngorms National Park, in northeast Scotland, are reflected in the River Spey, the second longest Scottish river

An aerial shot of the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, which despite being just 15 miles long has a whopping 38 locks

An aerial shot of the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal, which despite being just 15 miles long has a whopping 38 locks

Autumn is the best time to explore the landscape surrounding River Affric in Scotland, which is home to golden eagles, mountain hares and red deer

Autumn is the best time to explore the landscape surrounding River Affric in Scotland, which is home to golden eagles, mountain hares and red deer

The Leaderfoot Viaduct, also known as the Drygrange Viaduct, is a railway bridge over the River Tweed near Melrose in the Scottish Borders

The Leaderfoot Viaduct, also known as the Drygrange Viaduct, is a railway bridge over the River Tweed near Melrose in the Scottish Borders

The Birmingham Canals system is 100 miles long in total and includes the Gas Street Basin, pictured, which was completed in 1773 and runs through the heart of the city

The Birmingham Canals system is 100 miles long in total and includes the Gas Street Basin, pictured, which was completed in 1773 and runs through the heart of the city

The Millennium Bridge at Salford Quays crosses the Manchester Ship Canal, the 36-mile-long waterway that links Manchester with the Irish Sea

The Millennium Bridge at Salford Quays crosses the Manchester Ship Canal, the 36-mile-long waterway that links Manchester with the Irish Sea

Stunning images of Britain's rivers and canals, from Wiltshire to the Highlands

The quaint buildings in the village of Bourton-on-the-Water in the Cotswolds are reflected in the River Windrush, which meanders through some of Britain’s most charming countryside for 40 miles before joining the Thames 

Stunning images of Britain's rivers and canals, from Wiltshire to the Highlands

The River Avon, pictured near the Palladian Pulteney Bridge in Bath, rises just north of the village of Acton Turville in South Gloucestershire, before flowing through Wiltshire

A man steers a narrowboat over the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, which was built by Thomas Telford, the legendary 19th-century road, bridge and canal designer. The aqueduct is on the Llangollen branch of the Shropshire Union Canal

A man steers a narrowboat over the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, which was built by Thomas Telford, the legendary 19th-century road, bridge and canal designer. The aqueduct is on the Llangollen branch of the Shropshire Union Canal

A painter captures an autumnal scene on Regent's Canal in north London with its colourful narrowboats. The eight-mile-long canal provides a link from the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal to the Limehouse Basin and the River Thames in east London

A painter captures an autumnal scene on Regent’s Canal in north London with its colourful narrowboats. The eight-mile-long canal provides a link from the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal to the Limehouse Basin and the River Thames in east London

The early morning mist adds an ethereal ambience to the River Crigyll at Rhosneigr on the western coast of the Isle of Anglesey, North Wales. The river originates as a number of small streams and flows past the north side of Rhosneigr to reach the sea at Traeth Crigyll

The early morning mist adds an ethereal ambience to the River Crigyll at Rhosneigr on the western coast of the Isle of Anglesey, North Wales. The river originates as a number of small streams and flows past the north side of Rhosneigr to reach the sea at Traeth Crigyll

The Staffordshire and Warwickshire Canal forms part of the Black Country Ring, a canal system that offers hours of picturesque cruising. Pictured here is a lock at Penkridge in Staffordshire

The Staffordshire and Warwickshire Canal forms part of the Black Country Ring, a canal system that offers hours of picturesque cruising. Pictured here is a lock at Penkridge in Staffordshire

Llangollen Bridge in north-east Wales, which crosses the River Dee

Llangollen Bridge in north-east Wales, which crosses the River Dee 

Winter sunset over the 87-mile-long Kennet and Avon Canal, which links the Bristol Avon with the Thames at Reading

Winter sunset over the 87-mile-long Kennet and Avon Canal, which links the Bristol Avon with the Thames at Reading

The Trent and Mersey Canal was completed in 1777 and links the River Trent at Derwent Mouth in Derbyshire to the River Mersey, providing an inland route between the major ports of Hull and Liverpool. The stretch pictured here is in Stone, Staffordshire, where the tow path passes alongside old industrial buildings

The Trent and Mersey Canal was completed in 1777 and links the River Trent at Derwent Mouth in Derbyshire to the River Mersey, providing an inland route between the major ports of Hull and Liverpool. The stretch pictured here is in Stone, Staffordshire, where the tow path passes alongside old industrial buildings

The Grand Union canal weaves its way along the northern and eastern fringes of Milton Keynes from Cosgrove in the north to Fenny Stratford in the south

The Grand Union canal weaves its way along the northern and eastern fringes of Milton Keynes from Cosgrove in the north to Fenny Stratford in the south

The incredible Caen Hill Locks on the Kennet and Avon Canal at Devizes in Wiltshire. There are 29 in total

The incredible Caen Hill Locks on the Kennet and Avon Canal at Devizes in Wiltshire. There are 29 in total

The view of the magnificent River Tweed from Tweed Bridge in Peebles in the Scottish Borders. The Tweed flows east for 97 miles through the Scottish Borders and the very north of England and is a popular spot for salmon fishing. It enters the North Sea at Berwick-upon-Tweed

The view of the magnificent River Tweed from Tweed Bridge in Peebles in the Scottish Borders. The Tweed flows east for 97 miles through the Scottish Borders and the very north of England and is a popular spot for salmon fishing. It enters the North Sea at Berwick-upon-Tweed

The 5,189-metre-long (17,000ft) Standedge canal tunnel on the Huddersfield Narrow Canal in the Pennine Hills, north England, was built in 1811 and is Britain's longest canal tunnel. Having been closed to all traffic in 1943, the tunnel was re-opened in 2001

The 5,189-metre-long (17,000ft) Standedge canal tunnel on the Huddersfield Narrow Canal in the Pennine Hills, north England, was built in 1811 and is Britain’s longest canal tunnel. Having been closed to all traffic in 1943, the tunnel was re-opened in 2001 

The Great Ouse runs past the famous Cutter Inn riverside pub in Ely, Cambridgeshire. With a course of 143 miles (230km), mostly flowing north and east, it is the one of the longest rivers in the country

The Great Ouse runs past the famous Cutter Inn riverside pub in Ely, Cambridgeshire. With a course of 143 miles (230km), mostly flowing north and east, it is the one of the longest rivers in the country

The Lancaster Canal at the 2.5-mile-long Glasson Dock branch looking east towards Conder Green Mill and the lock gates near Glasson, Lancashire. The canal was originally planned to run from Westhoughton in Lancashire to Kendal in south Cumbria but the section around the crossing of the River Ribble was never completed

The Lancaster Canal at the 2.5-mile-long Glasson Dock branch looking east towards Conder Green Mill and the lock gates near Glasson, Lancashire. The canal was originally planned to run from Westhoughton in Lancashire to Kendal in south Cumbria but the section around the crossing of the River Ribble was never completed

The 14th-century West Gate Towers in Canterbury stand next to the River Stour

The 14th-century West Gate Towers in Canterbury stand next to the River Stour

The Grand Union Canal starts in London and ends in Birmingham, stretching for 137 miles with 166 locks, such as this one in the market town of Leighton Buzzard in Bedfordshire. The canal has branches (or 'arms') to places including Leicester, Slough, Aylesbury, Wendover and Northampton

The Grand Union Canal starts in London and ends in Birmingham, stretching for 137 miles with 166 locks, such as this one in the market town of Leighton Buzzard in Bedfordshire. The canal has branches (or ‘arms’) to places including Leicester, Slough, Aylesbury, Wendover and Northampton

The Lancaster Canal with a backdrop of the beautiful landscape at Farleton in Cumbria. The year 2019 marks 200 years since the completion of the main artery of the canal, which offers 41 miles of lock-free cruising – the longest stretch in the country

The Lancaster Canal with a backdrop of the beautiful landscape at Farleton in Cumbria. The year 2019 marks 200 years since the completion of the main artery of the canal, which offers 41 miles of lock-free cruising the longest stretch in the country

The ruins of Kinnoull Hill Tower in Perth overlook the River Tay, the longest in Scotland, spanning 117 miles (188km). It originates on the slopes of Ben Lui and drains much of the lower region of the Highlands, flowing into the Firth of Tay, south of Dundee

The ruins of Kinnoull Hill Tower in Perth overlook the River Tay, the longest in Scotland, spanning 117 miles (188km). It originates on the slopes of Ben Lui and drains much of the lower region of the Highlands, flowing into the Firth of Tay, south of Dundee

A fine spring day on the River Severn at Worcester, England, with clouds reflecting in the water. Running for 220 miles, the Severn is Britain's longest river

A fine spring day on the River Severn at Worcester, England, with clouds reflecting in the water. Running for 220 miles, the Severn is Britain’s longest river

Narrow Water Castle is a famous 16th-century tower house and bawn near Warrenpoint in Northern Ireland. It sits beside the A2 road and on the County Down bank of the Clanrye River, which enters Carlingford Lough a mile to the south

Narrow Water Castle is a famous 16th-century tower house and bawn near Warrenpoint in Northern Ireland. It sits beside the A2 road and on the County Down bank of the Clanrye River, which enters Carlingford Lough a mile to the south

The River Tay runs past St. Matthew's Church in the city of Perth and is crossed by Smeaton's Bridge. The bridge, built in 1771, is a historic landmark and plans are underway to carry out restoration work on it

The River Tay runs past St. Matthew’s Church in the city of Perth and is crossed by Smeaton’s Bridge. The bridge, built in 1771, is a historic landmark and plans are underway to carry out restoration work on it

The River Dee is crossed by the 14th-century Old Dee Bridge in Chester, Cheshire. The 68-mile-long river rises in Snowdonia, and flows east out to the sea in an estuary between Wales and the Wirral Peninsula

The River Dee is crossed by the 14th-century Old Dee Bridge in Chester, Cheshire. The 68-mile-long river rises in Snowdonia, and flows east out to the sea in an estuary between Wales and the Wirral Peninsula

The 46-mile-long Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal was completed in 1771 and was used to transport coal from Cannock to a power station at Stourport. By the 1950s the historic waterway had declined and faced closure, but a local volunteer group campaigned to save it and in 1968 the canal was reclassified as a cruiseway. The following year it was declared a Conservation Area

The 46-mile-long Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal was completed in 1771 and was used to transport coal from Cannock to a power station at Stourport. By the 1950s the historic waterway had declined and faced closure, but a local volunteer group campaigned to save it and in 1968 the canal was reclassified as a cruiseway. The following year it was declared a Conservation Area

The Caledonian Canal reflecting Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the British Isles at 1,345 metres (4,412ft) above sea level

The Caledonian Canal reflecting Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the British Isles at 1,345 metres (4,412ft) above sea level

The River Quoile passes the Downpatrick Cathedral in County Down, Northern Ireland. The river was created when Edward Southwell (1705–1755), landlord of Downpatrick, built a tidal barrier at the Quoile and began draining the land, creating 500 acres of solid ground from what was previously the western branch of Strangford Lough

The River Quoile passes the Downpatrick Cathedral in County Down, Northern Ireland. The river was created when Edward Southwell (1705–1755), landlord of Downpatrick, built a tidal barrier at the Quoile and began draining the land, creating 500 acres of solid ground from what was previously the western branch of Strangford Lough

The 60-mile-long Caledonian Canal connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William in Scotland. It is best enjoyed on a cruiseboat

The 60-mile-long Caledonian Canal connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William in Scotland. It is best enjoyed on a cruiseboat

The River Severn looking otherworldly on a frosty winter's day as it flows through Ironbridge in Shropshire

The River Severn looking otherworldly on a frosty winter’s day as it flows through Ironbridge in Shropshire

The Anderton Boat Lift, built in 1875, is a two-caisson lift near the village of Anderton, Cheshire, that provides a 50ft vertical link between the River Weaver and the Trent and Mersey Canal. The lift is included in the National Heritage List for England

The Anderton Boat Lift, built in 1875, is a two-caisson lift near the village of Anderton, Cheshire, that provides a 50ft vertical link between the River Weaver and the Trent and Mersey Canal. The lift is included in the National Heritage List for England

A picturesque journey in a barge on Brecon canal near Talybont-on Usk in Wales. Most of the navigable 35-mile stretch runs through the Brecon Beacons National Park

A picturesque journey in a barge on Brecon canal near Talybont-on Usk in Wales. Most of the navigable 35-mile stretch runs through the Brecon Beacons National Park

The lock at Tewkesbury on the River Avon. There are eight locks on the 26 miles of the Lower Avon between Tewkesbury and Evesham, and nine on the 22 miles of the Upper Avon between Evesham and Stratford. Locks on the Avon are manually operated by boaters

The lock at Tewkesbury on the River Avon. There are eight locks on the 26 miles of the Lower Avon between Tewkesbury and Evesham, and nine on the 22 miles of the Upper Avon between Evesham and Stratford. Locks on the Avon are manually operated by boaters

 



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The OTHER French Riviera: Who needs the Med when you can head west to the unspoiled Atlantic coast? 


From Brittany in the north to the Spanish border in the south, there are miles of charming spots to uncover on the Atlantic coastline in France. 

The sea may perhaps be rough, but there are a good deal of sheltered coves and bays to prevent the swells. 

We’ve trawled from top rated to bottom to discover ten of the best getaway places, with economical destinations to remain and sights that only the tremendous-rich encounter somewhere else.

Tranquil Brittany

Vive la distinction: A seaside in the Brittany resort of Morgat, on the Crozon peninsula’s rugged coastline  

The Crozon peninsula, on western Brittany’s rugged shoreline, wraps protectively about the resort of Morgat, retaining the Atlantic swell from its mile of soft-sand Blue Flag seashore.

Initially a sardine port, the village has developed into a energetic seaside haven with great swimming and watersports, all achieved by a short coastal path. Be a part of one particular of the tiny boat cruises and check out the sea caves dotted underneath the cliffs, or use a kayak and paddle there oneself.

Good to know: The GR34 coastal route passes via Morgat, so it’s simple to wander a workable portion. Try out the six-mile route to Cap de la Chevre by means of Fort Kador.

Wherever to continue to be: Lodge de la Baie is ideal on the seaside. Upgrade for a sea look at, or book one of the flats. Doubles charge from £59 (previthal.com).

Vendee Experience

Veillon beach, pictured, is in the Vendee region and is a favourite with both families and watersports fans

Veillon beach front, pictured, is in the Vendee region and is a favorite with both of those people and watersports fans 

In the Vendee region just north of La Rochelle, the swirling Payre estuary is stopped in its tracks by a very long, curving sand dune backed by pine woods.

Pick among the lagoon and the open sea at Veillon seaside. People with smaller little ones can stick to the inlet and rock swimming pools, when watersports followers will appreciate the very long, rolling waves, surfing, bodyboarding and kayaking.

Good to know: It is a 20-moment travel to Talmont-Saint-Hilaire, famed for its medieval castle, Chateau de Talmont, a previous dwelling of Richard the Lionheart.

In which to continue to be: Adhere to the route by way of the pines to obtain Les Jardins de l’Atlantique, a present day three-star resort with indoor and outside swimming pools and a spa. B&B doubles expense from £74 (jardins-atlantique.com).

Previous-fashioned allure

Benodet, pictured, is on Brittany's southern coast and has a classic seaside charm

Benodet, pictured, is on Brittany’s southern coastline and has a common seaside charm 

There is a pleasant excitement about Benodet, on Brittany’s southern coastline, which has a classic seaside appeal as effectively as currently being one particular of the region’s much more energetic resorts.

At the position in which the River Odet reaches the sea, you’ll discover a extensive, sandy beach backed by a pine-shaded promenade, cafe terraces and even a casino. When you’re not using boat trips together the river, enterprise out to the tiny Glenan islands, just ten miles off the coastline.

Good to know: Just across the Odet at Sainte-Marine, Michelin-starred Villa Tri Gentlemen serves seafood dishes from an enviable area on the clifftop.

Wherever to continue to be: Reverse the seaside, Relais Thalasso has a spa with a seawater pool, hot tub and saunas. Doubles from £104 (relaisthalasso.com).

Romantic Biscay

One of the beaches on Ile de Noirmoutier in the Bay of Biscay. It has around 25 miles of sandy stretches squeezed into its quirky shape

One particular of the beaches on Ile de Noirmoutier in the Bay of Biscay. It has about 25 miles of sandy stretches squeezed into its quirky condition

Linked to the mainland by a bridge, Ile de Noirmoutier, in the Bay of Biscay, has all around 25 miles of shorelines squeezed into its quirky condition. 

Just one of the most delightful is Plage des Dames, on its north-japanese side. It’s bookended by rocks, with a row of white seashore huts and a boardwalk that juts out into the sea.

Superior to know: Take a day excursion aboard a 1916 galleon to close by Pilier Island (from £51, oabandonado.com).

In which to keep: A 5-minute walk from the beach is Hotel Restaurant Les Prateaux, a cottage established in massive gardens. Doubles from £84 (lesprateaux.com).

Chic Ile de Re

The island of Ile de Re is accessible via a toll bridge from La Rochelle. Pictured is a shop in Le Bois-Plage-en-Re on the island

The island of Ile de Re is obtainable by using a toll bridge from La Rochelle. Pictured is a shop in Le Bois-Plage-en-Re on the island

Handful of French islands do scruffy-chic as easily as Ile de Re, available through a toll bridge from La Rochelle.

When you are not checking out its community of cycle paths or stopping at smaller oyster shacks for treats, you are stretching out on the southern coast seashores. A business favourite is Le Bois-Plage. Acquire picnic materials at the included marketplace right before watching the windsurfers in motion.

Very good to know: Not far from the beach front is a wine co-operative that delivers free of charge tours and tastings all calendar year round (vigneronsiledere.com)

In which to continue to be: On the edge of the island’s capital, St Martin, is dreamy Le Clos Saint-Martin, with two out of doors swimming pools and a Clarins spa. Doubles from £179 (le-clos-saint-martin.com).

Truly regal resort

Biarritz, pictured, is an easygoing, elegant town, which has been a favourite with European royalty since the 19th century

Biarritz, pictured, is an easygoing, sophisticated city, which has been a favorite with European royalty because the 19th century  

Biarritz’s huge surfing community adds an easygoing environment to this sophisticated city, a favourite with European royalty due to the fact the 19th century.

If you want a alter of scene from the chaotic Grande Plage, find a place on its much more tranquil neighbour, Plage du Miramar, which follows the sandy shore toward the lighthouse.

Fantastic to know: It was Napoleon’s nephew, Napoleon III, who created the vacation resort trendy, holidaying there every single summertime for much more than a ten years and even making a villa.

In which to continue to be: Formed like an ocean liner, 5-star Lodge Sofitel Biarritz Le Miramar has its have private entrance to Miramar beach front. Doubles cost from £135 (sofitel.accorhotels.com).

Europe’s tallest dune

Grande Dune du Pilat, pictured, is Europe's tallest sand dune, rising about 350ft above sea level. It can be found an hour west of Bordeaux in Arcachon Bay

Grande Dune du Pilat, pictured, is Europe’s tallest sand dune, soaring about 350ft above sea amount. It can be found an hour west of Bordeaux in Arcachon Bay 

Grande Dune du Pilat, an hour west of Bordeaux in Arcachon Bay, is one of the Atlantic coast’s best sights — Europe’s tallest sand dune, climbing about 350 ft previously mentioned sea amount and surrounded by pine forests and the ocean. The sights from the prime are wonderful.

From the vehicle park at the northern close of the dune, climb the white picket stairs to the major prior to scrambling back again to the beach.

Superior to know: If you would like a bird’s-eye watch, take a 15-minute tandem paraglide about the dunes with Sud-Ouest Parapente (from £51, sud-ouest-parapente.fr).

Where by to stay: French designer Philippe Starck’s chichi La Co(o)rniche resort is in an enviable location dealing with the dune, though the pool overlooks the ocean. Doubles value from £330 (lacoorniche-pyla.com).

Cote d’Argent Sands

Mimizan Plage, pictured, is within the Landes de Gascogne Regional Natural Park. It is popular with jetskiers and kitesurfers

Mimizan Plage, pictured, is in the Landes de Gascogne Regional Normal Park. It is well known with jetskiers and kitesurfers

Mimizan Plage, inside the Landes de Gascogne Regional Normal Park, kicks off the Cote d’Argent, a seemingly endless extend of sandy seashores that are never crowded.

Surfers, jetskiers and kitesurfers are in their factor below. Stick to the cycle paths inland to tranquil Lake Aureilhan, wherever you can test paddleboarding or have some entertaining in a Hawaiian-fashion canoe.

Good to know: A poet named Maurice Martin named the place ‘the Pearl of the Silver Coast’ soon after discovering it in 1905.

Exactly where to continue to be: L’Emeraude des Bois is a spouse and children-run, two-star lodge subsequent to the tiny Mimizan river. It gives bicycle employ and a treehouse that you can lease. Doubles value from £50 (emeraudedesbois.com).

Breton buzz

The Quiberon peninsula, which dangles from the Breton coast, has a wild western coastline

The Quiberon peninsula, which dangles from the Breton coastline, has a wild western shoreline

Dangling from the Breton coastline, the peninsula Quiberon has a big, crescent-formed seaside, a buzzing promenade and a golf system — as well as you can take working day excursions to the island of Belle-Ile.

For a enjoyable swim, stick to the primary seashore, Grande Plage, but for anything a tiny extra bracing, take a look at the wilder western coastline. Referred to as the Cote Sauvage, it has deserted beach locations, smaller coves and picturesque walks.

Fantastic to know: Monet captured the attractiveness of Belle-Ile through a ten-7 days continue to be in the 19th century.

Wherever to remain: Hotel La Petite Sirene has two shorelines within just a number of minutes’ stroll. Doubles cost from £42, with sea-see rooms from £67 (hotel-lapetitesirene.fr).

Basque Magnificence

The fishing village of Saint-Jean-de-Luz, pictured, is in the Basque country, just before the Spanish border

The fishing village of Saint-Jean-de-Luz, pictured, is in the Basque place, just ahead of the Spanish border 

Just in advance of the Spanish border is the fishing village of Saint-Jean-de-Luz, in the Basque place, with a broad sandy beach front that sits snugly involving the harbour arms.

It is 1 of the prettiest spots on the coastline, with normally Basque pink-and-white, half-timbered properties lining the seafront and the Pyrenees looming near.

Great to know: Louis the Fantastic married his 1st cousin, Maria Theresa, in the church of St John the Baptist in the 17th century.

Where to stay: Hotel de la Plage has balcony rooms with pretty sea sights. Doubles price tag from £84 (hoteldelaplage.com).

A map showing ten of the best holiday spots that can be found on the Atlantic coast of France

A map demonstrating 10 of the finest holiday getaway spots that can be observed on the Atlantic coast of France

 



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